Tuesday, 19 February 2013

Hot Weather Pictures

source(google.com.pk)
Hot Weather Pictures Biography
 I have been studying weather since I was eight years old.  It is a passion.  It is in my blood.  This passion is difficult to explain.  The sound of thunder, the wind rustling the leaves in the trees, the first snowflakes of winter, the first rainbow of spring. Watching the billowing cumulus clouds on a warm summers day.  Waiting for that first clap of thunder.  The pitter patter of raindrops outside my window.
I love weather!  It fascinates me.  I am driven to try and understand what makes the atmosphere work.
  I used to listen to NOAA Weather Radio on the school bus, at school, during recess, in my sleep.  The principal at my high school welcomed me into his office, during my lunch break, to watch The Weather Channel.  I was a geek.  One hundred percent pure weather geek.
  I can remember when the NWS had the old radar system.  You could watch the sweep line move over precipitation and light it up for a few seconds...it would then fade away.  One of the meteorologists, at our local office, gave me a lesson on how to view into storms (this was before Doppler Radar).  He showed me how to find hail spikes coming out of the top of a thunderstorm using the old radar system.  He would twirl this little knob and the radar beam would go up, higher and higher, into the storm.  I was in weather heaven!
  I still remember the smell of facsimile paper at the local flight service station.  FRESH facsimile paper, as the machine would slowly spit out the latest day one severe weather outlook or surface map.  I would have my fingers on it before the ink would dry!  I used to pester the lady at the flight station, here in Paducah, Kentucky.  We would dial up radars, through the telephone, and watch storms in Texas or Oklahoma (that was in the days when Texas and Oklahoma actually got storms) I think she enjoyed it as much as I did.
  Oh yeah and who can forget A.M. Weather?  I was probably the only kid in my school that woke up at 6 a.m. for the morning aviation weather briefing.  Yes, it gets no geeky than that.
Well now you know a little more about me.  I enjoy reading the biographies of other people so I figured someone might want to know the person behind this camera.
  All of that is good and well but what is truly important in life is family, friendships, and LIFE itself.  Spending time with those you care for and love.  Following your dreams.  Following your passions.  Doing what you think you need to do...pursuit of happiness!
 Taking time out of your day to listen to the snowflakes falling outside your window.  Listening to the trees crackle when the temperature is 5 degrees outside.  Watching a spectacular sunset or sunrise.  Nothing beats that!  Oh and don't forget the meteor showers.
 Life is supposed to be a journey.  We never arrive but rather we continue on.  There isn't an end goal.  There are just new adventures.  There will be pain.  There will be tragedy.  There will be beautiful sadness.  In the end though have no regrets.  Live life as it was meant to be lived.  In its fullest.
Weather is the state of the atmosphere, to the degree that it is hot or cold, wet or dry, calm or stormy, clear or cloudy. Most weather phenomena occur in the troposphere, just below the stratosphere. Weather generally refers to day-to-day temperature and precipitation activity, whereas climate is the term for the average atmospheric conditions over longer periods of time. When used without qualification, "weather" is understood to be the weather of Earth.
Weather is driven by air pressure (temperature and moisture) differences between one place and another. These pressure and temperature differences can occur due to the sun angle at any particular spot, which varies by latitude from the tropics. The strong temperature contrast between polar and tropical air gives rise to the jet stream. Weather systems in the mid-latitudes, such as extratropical cyclones, are caused by instabilities of the jet stream flow. Because the Earth's axis is tilted relative to its orbital plane, sunlight is incident at different angles at different times of the year. On Earth's surface, temperatures usually range ±40 °C (−40 °F to 100 °F) annually. Over thousands of years, changes in Earth's orbit affect the amount and distribution of solar energy received by the Earth and influence long-term climate and global climate change.
Surface temperature differences in turn cause pressure differences. Higher altitudes are cooler than lower altitudes due to differences in compressional heating. Weather forecasting is the application of science and technology to predict the state of the atmosphere for a future time and a given location. The atmosphere is a chaotic system, so small changes to one part of the system can grow to have large effects on the system as a whole. Human attempts to control the weather have occurred throughout human history, and there is evidence that human activity such as agriculture and industry has inadvertently modified weather patterns.
Studying how the weather works on other planets has been helpful in understanding how weather works on Earth. A famous landmark in the Solar System, Jupiter's Great Red Spot, is an anticyclonic storm known to have existed for at least 300 years. However, weather is not limited to planetary bodies. A star's corona is constantly being lost to space, creating what is essentially a very thin atmosphere throughout the Solar System. The movement of mass ejected from the Sun is known as the solar wind.
Weather is one of the fundamental processes that shape the Earth. The process of weathering breaks down the rocks and soils into smaller fragments and then into their constituent substances. During rains precipitation, the water droplets absorb and dissolve carbon dioxide from the surrounding air. This causes the rainwater to be slightly acidic, which aids the erosive properties of water. The released sediment and chemicals are then free to take part in chemical reactions that can affect the surface further (such as acid rain), and sodium and chloride ions (salt) deposited in the seas/oceans. The sediment may reform in time and by geological forces into other rocks and soils. In this way, weather plays a major role in erosion of the surface.
On Earth, temperatures usually range ±40 °C (100 °F to −40 °F) annually. The range of climates and latitudes across the planet can offer extremes of temperature outside this range. The coldest air temperature ever recorded on Earth is −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F), at Vostok Station, Antarctica on 21 July 1983. The hottest air temperature ever recorded was 57.7 °C (135.9 °F) at 'Aziziya, Libya, on 13 September 1922, but that reading is queried. The highest recorded average annual temperature was 34.4 °C (93.9 °F) at Dallol, Ethiopia. The coldest recorded average annual temperature was −55.1 °C (−67.2 °F) at Vostok Station, Antarctica. The coldest average annual temperature in a permanently inhabited location is at Eureka, Nunavut, in Canada, where the annual average temperature is −19.7 °C (−3.5 °F).
Weather is not limited to planetary bodies. Like all stars, the sun's corona is constantly being lost to space, creating what is essentially a very thin atmosphere throughout the Solar System. The movement of mass ejected from the Sun is known as the solar wind. Inconsistencies in this wind and larger events on the surface of the star, such as coronal mass ejections, form a system that has features analogous to conventional weather systems (such as pressure and wind) and is generally known as space weather. Coronal mass ejections have been tracked as far out in the solar system as Saturn. The activity of this system can affect planetary atmospheres and occasionally surfaces. The interaction of the solar wind with the terrestrial atmosphere can produce spectacular aurorae, and can play havoc with electrically sensitive systems such as electricity grids and radio signals.
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Hot Weather Picture

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